Tag Archive | Travels

Journeys – Part 2 by Devika Fernando

From Christina: Recently Sri Lankan writer Devika Fernando shared with us a few thoughts — and photographs — from her trip from the town of Kandy to the capital city of Colombo. Today, she continues her story, taking us on a different sort of journey.  Enjoy!

 

Collage for DF

 

 

 

 

Journeys – Part 2

by Devika Fernando

 

A while ago, I wrote a guest post about the arduous, exotic, nerve-wracking but also inspiring journey from Kandy to Colombo. This time, the journeys I discuss are not real-life ones in Sri Lanka, but just as chaotic and meaningful and filled with a tempting mix of positive and negative aspects.

Travelling has made me realize that each of my books deals with an inner journey and also involves a ‘real’ trip.

When I See Your Face

 External Journey:

The story starts with the heroine Cathy embarking on the most important journey of her life: She leaves behind her abusive husband to start from scratch in a small village. The change of places brings her closer to herself, gives her a breather from pressure, and makes her realize that life can be beautiful. She finds love – or does she? Destiny strikes again all too soon, which leads to another journey. This time, she settles down in a town that is a healthy middle-way between the city and the village from before.

 Internal Journey:

The switches of location aside, Cathy also undergoes major changes throughout the book. She transforms from beaten and battered and meek to being aware of herself, and wanting to tap into her potential. Slowly learning to trust again and to give herself as well as others a new chance, she grows up. Cathy finally takes matters into her own hands and fulfils her dream to start her cake business.

 

Playing with Fire

 External Journey:

Joshua is in town on a business trip when he rescues Felicia from a fire. What happens next is a clash of temperaments, elements and wills, and also more than a spark of attraction. Travelling has played an important role in Joshua’s life in the past. To find out more about that – and to get a hint at the final, decisive journey that both of them will make – you’ll have to read the book.

 Internal Journey:

Felicia starts out as a frustrated young woman, hiding a dark secret and burdened by a dull life of routine. When Joshua crosses her path, everything gets turned upside down. She realizes she needs to actively search for happiness and come to terms with her fire magic. The process of discovering and training her gift is filled with hurdles and challenges, much like a hike through the unknown wilderness. Ultimately, she will find herself and make a life-changing decision. Joshua also transforms, his journey leading him from loneliness and cold detachment to fascination, magic and even love and care.

 

Kaleidoscope of Hopes

(Coming in September)

External Journey:

The opening chapters introduce Nadia as a woman on the brink of losing her job, burdened by debts and a tragic past she’s hiding. When Lucas moves in next door, their fates are thrown together and they realize that they – and love – deserve a second chance. Trouble isn’t far away, however, and it makes Nadia flee the city. You’ll have to read the book to find out whether that is her last journey, and where and how they will find a happy end.

Internal Journey:

At first, Nadia is timid, quick to take the blame, tied to her past and as unhappy as can be. Lucas is lonely, too strict on himself and others, and also hiding a dark secret while trying to come to terms with being a father and falling hard for his new neighbour. Both embark on an internal journey that will leave them altered, opening up old wounds, facing their ghosts and working on self-improvement.

 Saved in Sri Lanka

(Work in Progress)

 External Journey:

This love story set in Sri Lanka circles around Sepalika, who works as a tour guide and falls in love with Irish Tourist Daniel. They spend seven days together on a round trip that changes everything. The exotic setting and travelling play an important role in enhancing the plot.

 Internal Journey:

Both protagonists learn a lot about themselves, about each other and about the respective country they’re from. Apart from that, they give real love a chance, and they realize that they are the main reason holding them back. Of course, there’s a dark secret causing trouble in the form of many rocks thrown into the way.



 

 

 

More from Devika Fernando

Journeys – Part 1
Nature Photography

About Devika

devikaAlmost as soon as Devika Fernando could write, she imagined stories and poems. After finishing her education in Germany and returning to her roots in Sri Lanka, she got a chance to turn her passion into her profession. Having lived in Germany and in Sri Lanka with her husband has made her experience the best (and the worst) of two totally different worlds – something that influences her writing. Besides being a romance novel author, she works as a German web content writer and as a translator. When she’s not writing, she’s reading or thinking about writing. Her debut romance novel, When I See Your Face, is now available at Amazon, as is her newly-released paranormal romance, Playing with Fire.

 

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Journeys – Part 1 by Devika Fernando

 

 

 

 

Sri Lanka

 

Journeys – Part 1

by Devika Fernando

I live near Kandy, a historically important city with a population of about 125,000 that lies smack in the middle of the island. It’s the capital of the Central Province and part of the Sri Lankan up-country filled with hills and mountains and picturesque villages. Colombo couldn’t be more different. I should know, I lived in one of its suburbs for 3 years, and I don’t ever want to go back. As the capital of Sri Lanka, Colombo boasts around 4.5 million inhabitants and is a metropolis right at the coast, part of the Western Province. If you’re looking for anything official and important, for entertainment and for modern high-rise buildings with luxury apartments, you’ll find it there. If you’re looking for teeming slums, smog, dirty politics and overcrowded roads, you’ll find those there, too.

Express Train

The unimaginably slow, so-called intercity express train

To travel from where we live to the capital city, it takes us 5 hours by car each way, which means a whole day needs to be sacrificed. The physical distance is about 130 km, but it feels like a trip to the other end of the world. Most of the journey takes you through villages and towns, up and down mountains, around hairpin-bends and through stretches of beautiful emptiness. You can’t drive faster than 40 km/h for the better part of the trip, and you need to constantly be on your toes unless you want some frustrated, maniacal driver to hit your vehicle. Taking the train isn’t much better. The vista is stunning, but the train crawls at (less than) walking speed, the noise is unbearable and the roughly 20 tunnels make reading a difficult task. I shouldn’t complain, though, because until the British colonized the island and drilled through the rock, a trip from Kandy to Colombo took several arduous days involving bullock carts, jungles and accidents galore.

Bible Rock

View of Bible Rock from Kadugannawa

All the stress aside, travelling from Kandy to Colombo has an exotic flair to it that gets my writer brain whirring. What fascinates me most – apart from the idyllic views of towering peaks, misty mountains ranges, oddly shaped rocky outcrops, impossibly green paddy fields and weed-choked lakes – is the hustle and bustle of life we pass by. You see a zillion shops, houses, schools, banks, restaurants and religious buildings, encroaching on the main road, much too numerous and close for comfort. There are constant traffic blocks, police check-points and crowds monopolizing the road. What adds to the fascinating flair is the fact that specific things are sold at intervals along the way:

Rambutan

Rambutan, mangosteen and durian

• When you wind your way down towards Colombo, you find inflatable toys and balls and boats and what-not lining both sides of the road in splashes of colour (don’t forget, going to Colombo means getting close to the beach).
• There is an aptly named town called Pilimathalawa where people specialize in arts and craft, or rather, in stone or plaster statues (pilima) of all kinds. Some of them are breathtakingly beautiful, others make me cringe with their kitsch and exaggeration.
• The crafty goodness goes on because not much later there’s a town dedicated to furniture and accessories woven from wood. The offers range from simple baskets over cupboards or tables and chairs to lampshades and statues made out of intricate wood weave.
• Up next are places where an array of vases, pots and decoration items made out of clay is on display. Pottery has always been important in this country.
• Following that comes a long stretch around the town of Kadugannawa where vendors sell steamed, salted corn on the cob and spicy snacks to brace yourself for the strenuous journey yet to come.
• Next you are met with girls and women clad in red-coloured traditional clothes who sell cashew nuts, roasted and unroasted. Cashews are available in supermarkets for an ungodly prize, but a little cheaper along the Colombo-Kandy road.
• Hold on tight, exotic fruits are last! It starts with durian, jackfruit, rambutan and mangosteens. Closer to the low-country regions, you can grab pineapples at bargain price.

With such highlights that never fail to interest me and will probably find their way into my book “Saved in Sri Lanka” (it’s in its draft stages at the moment), the negativity fades away a little.

If you have enjoyed reading about one of my journeys, stay tuned for Part 2, where I talk about the real and internal journeys the protagonists of my books face.

 



 

More from Devika Fernando

Nature Photography

About Devika

devikaAlmost as soon as Devika Fernando could write, she imagined stories and poems. After finishing her education in Germany and returning to her roots in Sri Lanka, she got a chance to turn her passion into her profession. Having lived in Germany and in Sri Lanka with her husband has made her experience the best (and the worst) of two totally different worlds – something that influences her writing. Besides being a romance novel author, she works as a German web content writer and as a translator. When she’s not writing, she’s reading or thinking about writing. Her debut romance novel, When I See Your Face, is now available at Amazon.